Water Works

Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? How LCA Collects, Treats and Transports Your H2O

Water, Water, Everywhere Clean water is one of those things you take for granted: When you walk into the kitchen and turn on the tap, it just flows out. But did you ever stop to wonder, “How did my water get here? Where does drinking water come from?” Over the next few blog posts, we’ll…

LCA Wins Water Quality Award for 12th Year in a Row

Congratulations to our great Water Filtration Plant team for receiving the Area Wide Optimization Program (AWOP) Award for the twelfth year in a row! The award is presented to participants that meet the American Water Works Association Partnership program’s water quality standards, which are much more stringent than standards set in place by the state Department…

Tertiary Nitrification: How Ammonia Is Removed From Wastewater

In our last post, we explained how plastic media filters remove contaminants during secondary treatment. Today we’re going to talk about the next level of treatment, which removes ammonia through a process called tertiary nitrification. As you can see from the picture above, it’s probably not what you imagine when you think of water treatment!…

Wastewater Treatment Starts with Screening Out Items That Don’t Belong

As long as everything works the way it’s intended, most of us take for granted the water and wastewater services we use every day. But have you ever been curious about how water gets to your tap? Ever wonder what happens after you flush the toilet? Through a series of semi-regular posts, we’re going to…

Pump it Up: The Role of LCA’s Giant Wastewater Movers

These gigantic machines are three of LCA’s six main sewage pumps, used in our wastewater treatment process. The pumps convey wastewater to the Aerated Grit chambers — the second part of the treatment process. (The first is screening, which removes larger objects — things like feminine hygiene products and disposable wipes, which shouldn’t be flushed anyway!) Aerated…

Did You Know Rainstorms Change the Water Treatment Process?

For most people, rain in the forecast is usually little more than a mild inconvenience. But at LCA, we have to watch that forecast very carefully, because rain affects how we treat and supply your water. We need to know how much we are getting, when it’s supposed to arrive, how long it should last,…

Celebrate National GIS Day with LCA

You probably didn’t know that Wednesday is National GIS Day. In fact, many of you are probably scratching your heads and thinking, “I don’t even know what GIS is!” GIS, or Geographic Information System, is a way to capture, manage, analyze and present geographically referenced data. In short, it’s a type of computerized mapping system….

Imagine a Day Without Water

Can you imagine a day without water? No water to drink, or even to make coffee with. No water to shower, flush the toilet, or do laundry. Hospitals would close. Firefighters couldn’t put out fires, and farmers couldn’t water their crops. A single nationwide day without water service would put $43.5 billion in economic activity…

The beauty of … bacteria?

  This is a beautiful photo — but what’s even more beautiful is what you can’t see: The water purification process taking place.  The water that’s being sprayed into the air is wastewater, and it’s landing on rocks that are coated with a film of specialized, microscopic organisms. As the wastewater trickles down through the…

That pesky snowfall is actually good for the water supply

As we find ourselves in the middle of a second snowstorm in just a few days, it’s as good a time as any to think about how much of that snow ends up in our drinking water.  Although snow can pile up quickly, an inch of snow and an inch of rain are very different…

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